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The Great War: World War I (1914–19)

The men of the 184th Battalion, taken in front of the CPR station before the train pulled out.

The Morden Cenotaph 


Morden Cenotaph

After almost 100 years, three forgotten soldiers from World War I were remembered in 2014, thanks to research by Morden Collegiate history teacher Darryl Toews. His students are now helping to identify others who may have been left off the memorial when it was first dedicated in 1921.

20140919 – Media Release – 100 Years of Rememberance

20140912 – Media Advisory – Cenotaph Project

The memorial also includes those who served in World War II and The Korean War.

The Morden Cenotaph is located in Confederation Park at Stephen Street and 9th Avenue. (photo credit: “We Will Remember” War Monuments of Canada).

Below are the names of Morden area residents who served in World War I, compiled by Darryl Toews. Names in red represent those recently added to the memorial.


Bailey, Arthur Reginald
 (May 3, 1891–November 24, 1921)
Rank: Private
Service Number: 874526
Attestation Paper (Library and Archives Canada)

Born in England, “Reg” Bailey came to Canada for health reasons around 1909 /1910 and farmed outside of Morden prior to enlisting on December 16, 1915. Bailey’s health problems returned after arriving in England with the 184th Battalion in 1916 and he was eventually discharged in August 1917 for health reasons. He returned to Manitoba and spent time in Ninette before he and his wife moved to Banff. They were visiting California to help with his health when he died on November 24, 1921, of a pulmonary hemorrhage that was attributed to his military service. His body was returned to Morden and he was buried with full military honours at Hillside Cemetery.

Bell, Gavin (March 1880– August 27, 1918)
Rank: Private
Service Number: 875359 and 441246
Attestation Paper 875359 (Library and Archives Canada)
Attestation Paper 441246 (Library and Archives Canada)

A native of Newcastle, England, Gavin Bell first enlisted in Winnipeg on September 22, 1915, with the 53rd Battalion but was discharged in January 1916 being deemed “unlikely to become efficient”. Bell lists Morden as his residence when he completed his second enlistment papers in Winnipeg on April 3, 1916. Serving with the 27th Battalion, Bell was killed in action on August 27, 1918, near Wancourt, France, by enemy machine gun fire during the Battle of Arras. He is buried at Wancourt British Cemetery near Arras.

Borthwick, David Scott (January 28, 1891–June 2, 1916)
Rank: Lieutenant
Officers’ Declaration Paper (Library and Archives Canada)

Born in Morden, Lieutenant Borthwick was a law student prior to enlisting on November 15, 1915. A few days after he enlisted, he married Nora Finn, daughter of Captain Theo Finn. He arrived in England with the 45th Battalion in January 1916 before transferring to the 1st Canadian Mounted Rifles on May 30 that year. He was reported missing at Sanctuary Wood during the Battle of Mount Sorrel and his death is listed as June 2, 1916. His wife Nora had traveled to England to meet him only to find upon her arrival that he was missing. Lieutenant Borthwick has no known grave and his name is engraved on the Menin Gate Memorial in Ypres, Belgium.

Brown, Emerson Kruspe (February 17, 1893–April 2, 1918)
Rank: Private
Service Number: 14439
Attestation Paper 
(Library and Archives Canada)

Incorrectly listed on Morden’s Cenotaph as Ernest Brown, Emerson Brown came to Morden from Elmira, Ontario at some point prior to 1914. He worked as a barber at Nathan Swallow’s barber shop and was a member of “C” Squadron 18th Mounted Rifles militia unit. He was among the first group from Morden to enlist in September 1914. Serving with Lord Strathcona’s Horse, Brown took part in numerous battles until his death on April 4, 1918, of a gunshot wound to the abdomen suffered during a German offensive at Moreuil Wood near Amiens, France. He is buried at Namps-au-Val British Cemetery near Amiens.

Bunnett, Herbert Edgar (March 26, 1882–November 6, 1917)
Rank: Private
Service Number: A24265 (424265)
Attestation Paper (Library and Archives Canada)

Herbert Bunnett’s exact connection to Morden is unclear but his service record shows that his assigned pay was directed to Richard Alleyn via the Union Bank of Canada branch in Morden. A May 1913 passenger record for the Manchester Commerce lists Bunnett as a passenger with his destination listed as Morden. Born in Tottington, England, Bunnett was a farmer when he enlisted with the 45th Battalion in Portage la Prairie on February 10, 1915. He transferred to and served with the 28th Battalion until he was reported missing and presumed dead on November 6, 1917, during the Battle of Passchendaele. Bunnett has no known grave and his name is engraved on the Menin Gate Memorial in Ypres, Belgium.

Card, Reginald (February 25, 1890–September 15, 1916)
Rank: Private
Service Number: 425530
Attestation Paper (Library and Archives Canada)

Reginald Card came to Thornhill from Somerset, England, in 1911. Working as a labourer, Card enlisted in Morden on September 14, 1915, with the 45th Battalion. He transferred to the 1st Canadian Mounted Rifles upon his arrival in France on June 6, 1916. Card was killed in action at Mouquet Farm on September 15, 1916, during the Battle of the Somme. He has no known grave and his name is engraved on the Vimy Memorial in France.

Cowan, Erwin Franklin (April 3, 1896–November 9, 1917)
Rank: Private
Service Number: 907529
Attestation Paper (Library and Archives Canada)

Born in Thornhill, Frank Cowan was a student in Regina when he enlisted there on March 27, 1916. He left for England on October 4, 1916, with the 175th Battalion before transferring to the 4th Canadian Machine Gun Corps on November 16, 1916. After training in England, Cowan arrived in France on March 13, 1917. He was killed in action on November 9, 1917, during the Battle of Passchendaele. Cowan has no known grave and his name is engraved on the Menin Gate Memorial in Ypres, Belgium.

Cram, Douglas Arthur (April 28, 1896–November 8, 1916)
Rank: Private
Service Number 420275
Attestation Paper (Library and Archives Canada)

Douglas Cram, born in Morden, worked as a chauffeur and was a student at Success Business College at the time of his enlistment on January 9, 1915. He arrived in England with the 43rd Battalion on June 10, 1915, but suffered from health issues for a number of months afterward. He reached the trenches in France on April 5, 1916, where he was attached to a number of different units until rejoining the 43rd Battalion in September that year. He died of gunshot wounds on November 8, 1916, near Abbeville, France. Cram is buried at the Abbeville Communal Cemetery.

Cram, William Howard (April 17, 1888–February 26, 1917)
Rank: Private
Service Number:701178
Attestation Paper (Library and Archives Canada)

William Cram was born in Morden and had been living in Winnipeg for more than six years when he enlisted on February 21, 1916. He arrived in France in November 1916 with the 16th Battalion. Cram was killed in action near Maison Blanche, France, on February 26, 1917. He is buried in the Fosse 10 Communal Cemetery Extension near Noeux-les-Mines.

 

Dickinson, Elmer John (June 20, 1887–February 4, 1924)
Rank: Captain
Officers’ Declaration Paper (Library and Archives Canada)

Born in Huntington, Quebec, Elmer Dickinson resided in Morden and worked as a physician in Roland when he enlisted with the Canadian Army Medical Corps on May 5, 1916. After serving in a number of military hospitals in Canada, he reached France on June 22, 1918, where he served in frontline aid stations. Dickinson was decorated for bravery by both the French and Canadian armies receiving the Croix de Guerre from France and the Military Cross from Canada for his efforts to help wounded soldiers while under enemy fire. After the war, he remained in London at a military hospital before returning to Winnipeg to join the medical staff at Tuxedo hospital. Sources suggest that the continued effects of his exposure to wartime poison gas resulted in a move for health reasons to Natal, South Africa, with his wife and son. He worked there as a doctor before his death in Pietermaritzburg, Natal, on February 4, 1924. He is buried at the Church of England in Pietermartizburg.

Dudgeon, James (May 28, 1896–May 3, 1917)
Rank: Private
Service Number: 874493
Attestation Paper (Library and Archives Canada)

James Dudgeon was born south of Morden in Shadeland. When he enlisted with the 184th Battalion in Morden on March 4, 1916, he was living and farming in the Darlingford area. After his arrival at the front near the end of 1916, Dudgeon was transferred to the 27th Battalion. He was wounded during military operations near Fresnoy, France, and was killed by an enemy shell on his way to the Regimental Aid Post. Dudgeon has no known grave and his name is engraved on the Vimy Memorial in France.

Forster, James Herbert (February 20, 1882–October 15, 1916)
Rank: Captain
Attestation Paper (Library and Archives Canada)

Born in Nelsonville, “Bert” Forster was the manager of the Morden electric light plant for many years and was a member of the local band and orchestra. He had, along with his older brother Fred, served during the Boer War in South Africa. In Morden, he was a member of “C” Squadron 18th Mounted Rifles when war was declared and he enlisted on September 25, 1914. His brothers Marshall (killed in action), Gordon (wounded) and Russell (underage) also enlisted. Forster was sent to England with the first contingent but returned to Canada in early 1915 to take command of reinforcements. He was again stationed in England as a training officer for a number of months but in June 1916 joined the 1st Canadian Mounted Rifles in France. Forster died of a gunshot wound to the leg on October 15, 1916, during the Battle of the Somme. He is buried at St. Sever Cemetery in Rouen, France.


Forster, Marshal Bidwell
 (July 1, 1890–June 14, 1916)
Rank: Sergeant
Service Number: 422006
Attestation Paper (Library and Archives Canada)

A civil engineer by profession, Marshall Forster was born in Morden. He was living in Calgary when he enlisted there on November 16, 1914. His brothers “Bert” (killed in action), Gordon (wounded) and Russell (underage) also enlisted. Forster arrived in France with the 8th Battalion on September 7, 1915. He was killed in action on June 14, 1916, during the Battle of Mount Sorrel. Foster has no known grave and his name is engraved on the Menin Gate Memorial in Ypres, Belgium.

Fraser, James McConnell (January 22, 1891–October 10, 1918)
Rank: Private
Service Number: 286
Attestation Paper (Library and Archives Canada)

James Fraser was living in Toronto and employed as a fireman when he enlisted on March 5, 1915. He initially served with the Canadian Railway Construction Corps but was court-martialed in December 1915 and again in June 1916 for absenting himself without leave. Fraser was imprisoned in each case for short periods. He was court-martialed for desertion again in June 1917 and sentenced to a year’s detention. By August 1918 he had been transferred to the 20th Battalion and was with that battalion on October 10, 1918, when he was instantly killed at the Scheldt Canal by an enemy shell that landed directly in front of him. Fraser has no known grave and his name is engraved on the Vimy Memorial in France.

Godfrey, Edward Baker (June 14, 1875–July 27, 1917)
Rank: Private
Service Number: 874537
Attestation Paper (Library and Archives Canada)

Edward Godfrey, who lived and farmed in the Rosebank area, was in his early forties when he enlisted on January 21, 1916. He was married with four children. Originally from Redbourne, England, he left Canada with the 184th Battalion in October 1916 and was transferred to the 8th Battalion after arriving in England. He suffered a gunshot wound to the hand in April 1917 and was killed in action a few months later during an attack at Les Brebis on July 27, 1917. Godfrey has no known grave and his name is engraved on the Vimy Memorial in France.

Hamilton, John William (October 31, 1894–September 30, 1916)
Rank: Private
Service Number: 14949
Attestation Paper (Library and Archives Canada)

A stenographer by trade, William Hamilton was born in Morden but was living near Miami when he enlisted on September 24, 1914. He was a member of “C” Squadron 18th Mounted Rifles. Hamilton was serving with the Canadian Corps Cavalry Regiment when he died of wounds at No. 35 Field Ambulance in France. He is buried at Pozieres British Cemetery in France.

Helgason, Elis (January 26, 1895–September 27, 1918)
Rank: Private
Service Number: 2379041
Attestation Paper (Library and Archives Canada)

Born in Gardar, North Dakota, Helgason’s family moved to the Morden area in 1900 and farmed near North Star. He was conscripted under the Military Service Act on November 8, 1917, and arrived in France in early September 1918 with the 43rd Battalion before being transferred to the 8th Battalion on September 11, 1918. Nearly two weeks later Helgason was reported missing and killed in action during an advance at Bourlon Wood on the Cambrai front. Helgason is buried in the Sancourt British Cemetery southeast of Douai, France.

Hewitt, John Melville (April 9, 1898–June 14, 1919)
Rank: Private
Service Number: 460531
Attestation Paper (Library and Archives Canada)

Originally from Stony Mountain, Manitoba, Mel Hewitt was the son of Morden’s mayor Robert Thomas Hewitt. His older brother Scott also served and was awarded a Military Medal for gallantry in 1918. Enlisting in June 1915, Hewitt arrived in France in August 1916 with the 44th Battalion. Hewitt suffered a gunshot wound to the face near Bologne in November 1916 but survived the war and was discharged on March 15, 1918, for medical reasons. He returned to Morden where died on June 14, 1919, of tuberculosis. He is buried at Hillside Cemetery in Morden.

Holo, Oliver Benjamin (February 9, 1871–September 15, 1917)
Rank: Private
Service Number: 267814
Attestation Paper (Library and Archives Canada)

Oliver Holo was born in Fergus Falls, Minnesota, and was farming near Theodore, Saskatchewan, when he enlisted on April 13, 1916. His father and family were living in the Brown Post Office district south of Morden at the time. He reached France with the 5th Battalion on August 7, 1917, and died of shrapnel wounds and a fractured skull five weeks later at the No. 7 Casualty Clearing Station. He is buried at Noeux-Les-Mines Communal Cemetery Extension south of Bethune, France.

Howell, James Henry (1889–April 8, 1920)
Rank: Private
Service Number: 15379
Attestation Paper (Library and Archives Canada)

Born in Morden, Jim Howell farmed in the Morden area and was a member of “C” Squadron 18th Mounted Rifles when he enlisted on September 24, 1914. He left Canada with the 6th Battalion and shortly after his arrival in France, Howell was transferred to Lord Strathcona’s Horse in June 1915. He appears to have made it through the war without significant physical injury but suffered from trench foot and chronic bronchitis during his time at the front. He was granted permission to marry his wife Alice, who was living in Kent, England, in October 1917 and was demobilized on January 31, 1919. They returned to Morden but Howell continued to suffer health problems and died at St. Boniface Hospital of bronchial pneumonia on April 8, 1920. He is buried at Hillside Cemetery in Morden.

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Jonason, Sveinn (April 1881–March 30, 1918)
Rank: Private
Service Number: 874545
Attestation Paper (Library and Archives Canada)

Born in the town of Ridgvick, Iceland, Sveinn Jonason was a farmer in the Brown P.O. district south of Morden at the time of his enlistment in Morden on December 22, 1915. He left Canada with the 184th Battalion and arrived in England in November 1916. Jonason was transferred to the 78th Battalion in January 1917 and reached the trenches in April 1917. Jonason was reported wounded in action on October 30, 1917, but remained on duty. On March 30, 1918, Jonason was killed in action in the trenches near Lens, France. He is buried at Villers Station Military Cemetery in France.

Keir, Lawrence Edward (August 2, 1896–March 24, 1918)
Rank: Private
Service Number: 461188
Attestation Paper (Library and Archives Canada)

Born in Morden, Lawrence Keir was an electrician when he enlisted in Morden on October 5, 1915. He reached England with the 61st Battalion on April 12, 1916, and was transferred to the Royal Canadian Regiment in June 1916. Keir suffered a gunshot wound to the chest in July 1916 at Ypres, Belgium, and spent the next year in a hospital in England. He returned to France in September 1917 where he was assigned to the 1st Canadian Motor Machine Gun Brigade, Borden Motor Machine Gun Battery, in November that year. Keir was killed in action on March 24, 1918, during an enemy attack at Clery, France. The Borden Motor Machine Gun Battery suffered 93% casualties in its effort to block the enemy attack. Keir has no known grave and his name is engraved on the Vimy Memorial in France.

Langtry, Orval Forrest (March 7, 1898 – August 21, 1917)
Rank: Private
Service Number: 874533
Attestation Paper (Library and Archives Canada)

Orval Langtry was born in Morden and was farming with his father, George Langtry, when he enlisted in Morden on February 19, 1916, with the 184th Battalion. Langtry arrived in England in November 1916 and trained there until late April 1917 when he was sent to France with the 78th Battalion. A few months later, on August 10, 1917, Langtry was reported “dangerously wounded” after suffering shrapnel wounds to the abdomen. Langtry died of those wounds on August 21, 1917, at the Royal Army Medical Corps #23 Casualty Clearing Station located at Lozinghem, France. He is buried at Lapugnoy Military Cemetery near Bethune, France.

Longney, Victor John (February 8, 1892–August 21, 1918)
Rank: Private
Service Number: 693201
Attestation Paper (Library and Archives Canada)

A farmer from Thornhill, near Morden, he joined the 43rd Battalion, Canadian Infantry. He was reported killed in the Manitoba Free Press, September 3, 1918.


Masson, Charles Coutts 
(May 18, 1897–September 28, 1918)
Rank: Private
Service Number: 830274
Attestation Paper (Library and Archives Canada)

Charles Masson was a farmer from Darlingford near Morden who enlisted in the 44th Battalion. He was reported wounded in the Winnipeg Tribune, April 27, 1917, but no other information about his death was found.

McClain, Ervine Whitby (December 12, 1895–September 28, 1918)
Rank: Private
Service Number: 2129331
Attestation Paper (Library and Archives Canada)

Born in Morden, Ervine McClain worked as a clerk until he joined the 8th Battalion, Canadian Infantry. He was reported killed in action in the Manitoba Free Press, October 22, 1918.

McGirr, Robert (February 13, 1894– August 23, 1917)
Rank: Private
Service Number: 871706
Attestation Paper (Library and Archives Canada)

Robert McGirr served in the 8th Battalion, Canadian Infantry. He was reported to have died of wounds in the Manitoba Free Press, August 31, 1917. He was born in Emerson, but the article refers to him as previously living in Morden before moving to Winnipeg. He worked as a drug clerk.

McKone, Manuel Lawrence Sydney (September 6, 1897–December 3, 1993)
Rank: Private
Service Number: 874252
Attestation Paper (Library and Archives Canada)

Manuel McKone was born in Morden but moved to Winnipeg before the war. A clerk in civilian life, he served in the 27th Battalion, Canadian Infantry. He was reported wounded in the Winnipeg Tribune, May 1, 1917, and the Winnipeg Tribune, May 5, 1917, in an article about 20 wounded Winnipeg soldiers, but in the article, he was mistakenly reported to have been killed in August 1916 (a JMA McKone was killed in August 1916). Sydney McKone died in 1993 (his obituary is in the Winnipeg Free Press, December 6, 1993). According to the Brandon Sun, April 9, 1987, and the Winnipeg Free Press, April 9, 1987, he returned to visit the Vimy battlefield.

McNaughton, Donald Robert (October 8, 1892–June 19, 1917)
Rank: Quartermaster Sergeant
Service Number: 19468

Donald McNaughton was a commercial traveler in civilian life but served as an Artificer Quarter Master Sergeant (responsible for repair and maintenance of equipment) in the 26th Battalion, Royal Fusiliers, British Army. He was born in Underwood, Minnesota and immigrated to Canada in 1903, living on 10th Street in Morden. He later lived and married in the United Kingdom, where he enlisted in the British Army. A census document for 1916 shows him overseas in France on military service.

McRae, John Allan (January 3, 1873–August 2, 1926)
Rank: Sergeant
Service Number: 874557
Attestation Paper (Library and Archives Canada)

He was a civil engineer before joining the 184th Battalion, CEF. He died in 1926 in Selkirk of causes related to his service. According to his attestation papers, he lived in Morden but is buried at the Clandeboye United Churchyard. The location of his name on the cenotaph suggests it was added after 1921.

Nicklin, Joseph (November 29, 1894–April 9, 1917)
Rank: Private
Service Number: 875245
Attestation Paper (Library and Archives Canada)

Joseph Nicklin worked as a labourer in Brown, south of Morden, then joined the 78th Battalion, Canadian Infantry. He was reported killed in action in the Vancouver Daily World, May 8, 1917.

O’Brien, Walter Burritt (February 23, 1896–May 25, 1916)
Rank: Private
Service Number: 460588
Attestation Paper (Library and Archives Canada)

Born in Morden and adopted by James and Julia O’Brien of Morden, he worked as a clerk before joining the 61st Battalion, Canadian Infantry. He died of mastoids (an inner ear infection) at Winnipeg General Hospital on May 25, 1916, and is buried at Brookside Cemetery in Winnipeg. His Military Service was in Canada only.

Osborne, Joseph (July 31, 1879–June 6, 1916)
Rank: Private
Service Number: 425172
Attestation Paper (Library and Archives Canada)

Joseph Osborne was a blacksmith in Morden before he joined the 31st Battalion, Canadian Infantry. He was reported killed in action in the Winnipeg Tribune, June 23, 1916.

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Palmer, George Joshua (September 9, 1891–April 29, 1917)
Rank: Private
Service Number: 874561
Attestation Paper (Library and Archives Canada)

George Palmer worked as a teamster in Morden and served in the 8th Battalion, Canadian Infantry. He was reported to have died of wounds in by the Vancouver Daily World, May 14, 1917.

Parker, Hugh Daniel (June 26, 1895–September 15, 1916)
Rank: Private
Service Number: 623078
Attestation Paper (Library and Archives Canada)

Born in Morden, he was a student before joining the 27th Battalion, Canadian Infantry. He was reported wounded in the Winnipeg Tribune, December 2, 1916, and reported missing in the Winnipeg Tribune, December 12, 1916 (the article indicates he was previously reported to be wounded).

Parry, John Leopold (November 14, 1889–June 6, 1916)
Rank: Private
Service Number: 424205
Attestation Paper (Library and Archives Canada)

John Parry was a farmer before enlisting in the 5th Battalion, Canadian Infantry, Service number 424205 (his regimental number is listed as A24205 but 424205 should be used for a national archives search). He lived in Dunston near Morden.

Pigott, Henry Alexander Doyne (June 25, 1897–November 14, 1917)
Rank: Private
Service Number: 874254
Attestation Paper (Library and Archives Canada)

A student, he joined the 12th Company, Canadian Machine Gun Corps. He was reported killed in action in the Manitoba Free Press, December 4, 1917.

Robb, John (September 27, 1888–October 8, 1916)
Rank: Private
Service Number: 622433
Attestation Paper (Library and Archives Canada)

John Robb was born in Scotland and records indicate his family came to the Morden area in 1913. His brother Alexander Robb farmed near Morden. Robb enlisted in Portage la Prairie in April 1915 and served in the 27th Battalion, Canadian Infantry. Robb was hit by shrapnel and died almost immediately in the front trenches at St. Eloi during an enemy bombardment. He is buried at Ridge Wood Military Cemetery in Belgium.

Simmons, George Arthur (February 29, 1896–July 26, 1915)
Rank: Private
Service Number: 15430
Attestation Paper (Library and Archives Canada)

George Simmons was born in Morden and was a member of the 18th Mounted Rifles militia when he enlisted in August 1914. He arrived in Europe with the Fort Garry Horse the following spring and by late May 1915, he had been transferred to the Lord Strathcona’s Horse. In July, Simmons died at the #3 Canadian Field Hospital of wounds suffered from an artillery attack near Messines, France. Simmons was the first of Morden’s volunteers to die in the war. He is buried at Trois Arbres cemetery in France.

Smith, John McPherson (February 1, 1886–June 13, 1916)
Rank: Private
Service Number: 155041
Attestation Paper (Library and Archives Canada)

John Smith left his job as a mechanist to join the 1st Pioneer Battalion, Canadian Pioneers. He was reported killed in action in the Winnipeg Tribune, June 22, 1916. His Circumstances of Death card lists his next of kin as living in Morden.

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Tate, George Frederick (May 18, 1889–November 21, 1917)
Rank: Private
Service Number: 700229
Attestation Paper (Library and Archives Canada)

George Tate was a farmer before enlisting in the 19th Battalion, Canadian Infantry. He was reported to have died of wounds in the Manitoba Free Press, December 4, 1917. His attestation papers list Dunston, near Morden, as his hometown.

Thorington, Sydney Robert (May 23, 1878–May 3, 1917)
Rank: Private
Service Number: 875148
Attestation Paper (Library and Archives Canada)

Sydney Thorington was a farmer before joining the 26th Battalion, Canadian Infantry. He was reported killed in action in the Manitoba Free Press, January 4, 1918. The article refers to him being from Morden, as do his attestation papers.

Uhrich, Charles Philip (August 22, 1893–June 24, 1918)
Rank: Lieutenant

A native of Winkler, Charles Uhrich studied law at the University of Manitoba. While a student, he worked with the law firm Macdonald, Craig, Tarr and Ross and was an active member of the Winnipeg Canoe Club and the University Drama Society. Charles Uhrich completed his law degree at the University of Manitoba after joining the Royal Flying Corps in the summer of 1917. He spent time training in Toronto and Texas and graduated from the School of Aerial Gunnery in December 1917 before joining the 28th Squadron, 14th Wing, Royal Air Force. His death in Italy was the result of an “aero accident”. He is buried at Montecchio Precalcino Communal Cemetery Extension in the province of Vicenza, Italy.

Walkof, Daniel (May 4, 1893–September 29, 1916)
Rank: Private
Service Number: 71544
Attestation Paper (Library and Archives Canada)

Born in Gretna and a carpenter in civilian life, he became a Corporal in the 27th Battalion, Canadian Infantry. He was reported to have died of wounds in the Winnipeg Tribune, October 7, 1916. A 1901 Census document shows the family living in Lisgar, Stanley Municipality under the name Wolkloff. Next of kin on his attestation papers is his brother Alfred, which is confirmed by census information.

Weir, Clifford H.E. (December 7, 1894–December 13, 1918)
Rank: Private
Service Number: 880865

Born in Morden, Clifford Weir left Morden around 1913 and was living in the United States when that country joined the war in 1917. He enlisted with the US Army in July 1917, and served with the Spruce Squadron in Washington. He died of bronchial pneumonia in December 1918, at Camp Lewis, Washington. Weir’s body was returned to Morden and he was buried at Hillside Cemetery in Morden on  December 21, 1918.

Wilson, Thomas Henry (September 17, 1890–October 8, 1918)
Rank: Private
Service Number: 3347995
Attestation Paper (Library and Archives Canada)

Thomas Wilson was born in Morden and was living and farming near Thornhill when he was conscripted under the Military Service Act on July 9, 1918. He was training in Quebec when he fell victim to the Spanish Flu. Wilson died at the Royal Victoria Hospital in Montreal and his body was returned to Morden where he was buried at Hillside Cemetery on October 15, 1918.

Wilton, Walter Barron (March 26, 1877–August 21, 1917)
Rank: Lieutenant

A commission merchant in civilian life, he became a Lieutenant in the 27th Battalion, Canadian Infantry, Service number 425498. He was reported killed in action in the Manitoba Free Press, September 4, 1917. He was born in High Bluff.

Wisdom, Thomas Veitch (January 24, 1888–May 26, 1920)
Rank: Private
Service Number: 875248
Attestation Paper (Library and Archives Canada)

Wisdom lived in Manitou, near Morden, and joined the 184th Battalion, Canadian Infantry. He enlisted at Morden and his widow is listed as living in Morden on his Circumstances of Death card. The Death card indicates he had syphilis and was thus not eligible for treatment as a War Grave. He is buried at Brookside Cemetery in Winnipeg.

Relatives and friends say goodbye to soldiers leaving for overseas duty with the First Canadian Overseas Contingent. Part of the Fort Garry Horse, and under the command of Lieutenant Colonel A. C. D. Pigott, these men volunteered for active overseas service when the Great War began and had been members of the 18th Mounted Rifles militia based in Morden (photo taken August 22, 1914).

World War II (1939–45)

The home front held a complex culture for those who served and those who were conscientious objectors, based on the culture of pacifism within the Mennonite church. Yet in spite of the rifts that were created in many families and churches, thousands of local men and women enlisted in the war effort, and later returned home. Some of the men who returned would later bring their war brides to begin new lives as a family in rural Manitoba.

Below are the names of Morden area residents who gave their lives in World War II and are commemorated on the Morden cenotaph, compiled by Darryl Toews.

Manitoba’s war dead are also commemorated through the Manitoba Geographical Names Program. Geographical features are listed for nearly all of the names listed below.

 Biehl, William McKay (?–June 13, 1944)
Rank: Sergeant
Service Number: 622666
Branch of Service: No. 78 Squadron, Royal Air Force
Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Enlisting in July 1938 as ground crew, William Biehl became an air gunner in 1942. Biehl was recognized in April 1941 for his actions to rescue a number of people trapped in a West End London air raid shelter that was hit by a bomb. Biehl was a weapons operator/air gunner on a Halifax III Bomber that was shot down during an air raid over France. It was one of thirty aircraft lost during that raid. Biehl is buried at Poix-de-Picardie Churchyard near Amines, France.

Biehl Lake is west of Churchill and north of Leaf Rapids.

Cram, John Samuel (September 8, 1916–September 7, 1943)
Rank: Pilot Officer
Service Number: J27370
Branch of Service: Royal Canadian Air Force
Canadian Virtual War Memorial

John Cram was born in Morden and worked at the Provincial Government Land Titles Office as an office clerk when he enlisted on February 27, 1941. Cram was also a trooper with the Manitoba Mounted Rifles. After training in Edmonton, Regina, Mossbank, Rivers, and Lachine, he graduated as a sergeant-observer and eventually became a navigator. He received his commission in 1943 after spending a year-and-a-half in the Ferry Command. Cram was a passenger on an American C-87 Liberator (#4140) which crashed and caught fire while returning to Accra, Ghana (British Gold Coast), after take off. Cram is buried at the Christiansborg War Cemetery in Ghana. His brothers Murray, Bill, King, and Wallace were all in the armed forces.

Cram Lake is southwest of Churchill.

Derksen, Jacob (May 9, 1923–March 8, 1945)
Rank: Private
Service Number: H69770
Branch of Service: Royal Hamilton Light Infantry, Royal Canadian Infantry Corps
Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Jacob Derksen was born in Horndean, Manitoba, and worked as a clerk at the Pitch Brothers retail store in Morden when he enlisted on April 16, 1942. He trained as a gunner with the 49th Field Battery of the Royal Canadian Artillery before being transferred to the 1st Battalion Rocky Mountain Rangers infantry reserve regiment and then the Royal Hamilton Light Infantry. Derksen was killed in action in German and is buried at Groesbeek Canadian War Cemetery near Nijmegen, Netherlands. His brothers Abe and John were both in the armed forces.

Derksen Lake is north of Lac Brochet.

Dorval, Oscar Anthony (May 16, 1914–July 3, 1943)
Rank: Trooper
Service Number: K38108
Branch of Service: Royal Canadian Armoured Corps
Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Born at Kaleida, Manitoba, Oscar Dorval grew up in the Morden area and attended Clegg School. He moved to Birtle in 1930 to work on his brother Maurice’s farm. In 1935, Dorval moved to Willow Point, BC, where he worked as a miner. He enlisted in BC and was eventually transferred to the 3rd Canadian Armoured Brigade. On July 22, 1942, he married Gladys Richardson. He arrived overseas on November 26, 1942. Dorval died the following summer of bacterial endocarditis and is buried at Brookwood Cemetery in England.

Dorval Lake is south of Port Nelson and York Factory.

Endert, Edward (May 29, 1920–August 14, 1944)
Rank: Corporal
Service Number: H20358
Branch of Service: Queen’s Own Cameron Highlanders of Canada, Royal Canadian Infantry Corps
Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Edward Endert was born in Morden and was working as a labourer when he enlisted in Winnipeg on June 26, 1940. He was killed in action in France and is buried at Bretteville-sur-Laize Canadian War Cemetery near the village of Cintheaux, France.

Endert Lake is north of Lac Brochet, at the northwest corner of the province.

Enns, Gordon Howard (April 9, 1911–September 24, 1944)
Rank: Private
Service Number: K67786
Branch of Service: Westminster Regiment (Motor), Royal Canadian Infantry Corps
Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Gordon Enns was born in Winkler and was living in British Columbia when he enlisted in Vancouver on July 18, 1940. He was killed in action in Italy and is buried at Cesena War Cemetery in Cesena, Italy. His brother Larry also served. Enns’ name also appears on the war memorial in Winkler.

Enns Lake is northeast of Reindeer Lake.

Funk, Nelson (? – ?)
Rank: 2nd Lieutenant
Branch of Service: ?

There has been no information found thus far to confirm the identity or death of Nelson Funk. Funk’s name also appears on the war memorial in Winkler.

Gross, Bernard Bernhard (November 9, 1916–June 6, 1944)
Rank: Rifleman
Service Number: H41255
Branch of Service: Royal Winnipeg Rifles, Royal Canadian Infantry Corps
Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Born in Morden, Bernard Gross was working on the R. Glover farm near Roland when he enlisted in Brandon, MB, on June 27, 1940. Gross landed in France on D-Day with the Royal Winnipeg Rifles. On June 6, 1944, the Gross family received an Official Canadian Army Overseas Casualty Notification indicating that Gross had been wounded in action. Later that day, a second notification arrived that gave the family the news that he had died of those wounds. Gross is buried at Beny-sur-Mer Canadian War Cemetery in Normandy east of the village of Reviers, France.
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Gross Lake is near the northeast corner of the province.

Hildebrand, Abram R. (July 6, 1917–July 29, 1944)
Rank: Flying Officer
Service Number: J22309
Branch of Service: 162 (R.A.F.) Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force
Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Born in Plum Coulee, MB, Abram “Hildy” Hildebrand was living in Tillsonburg, Ontario, and working as a carpenter in nearby London with General Engineers construction contractors when he enlisted on October 9, 1940, with the Oxford Rifles. He transferred to the Royal Canadian Air Force in early 1941. While stationed in Chatham, New Brunswick, Hildebrand married Margaret McLean in September 1943. He was the pilot of RCAF Canso flying boat A11062 that left Iceland on a sub hunting mission that was to end at RAF Wick. Due to heavy fog, the destination was changed to RAF Stornoway on the island of Lewis. On the return flight, the plane crashed into a hill on Foula Island, west of the Shetland Islands. The flight engineer, Flight Sergeant J. H. Knight, was the only one of the eight crew members to survive the crash. Hildebrand is buried at Lerwick New Cemetery at Shetland, UK. Hildebrand’s name also appears on the war memorial in Winkler.

Hildebrand Lake is west of Oxford House.

Kendall, John McNabb (August 15, 1922–December 23, 1943)
Rank: Flying Officer
Service Number: J14708
Branch of Service: 226 (R.A.F.) Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force
Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Born in Morden, John Kendall was living in Thornhill and worked on his mother’s farm at the time of his enlistment on June 12, 1941. He was also working in Thornhill for Cooperative Oil and Supplies as a grain handler. He was the pilot of a Beaufighter XI that was hit by flak while attacking enemy shipping in the bay near Monemvasia, Greece. According to other members of the squadron, Kendall’s aircraft “lost height gradually until it hit the high ground surrounding the bay and blew up.” Initially reported missing, Kendall and his Royal Air Force navigator Flying Officer Roderick MacKay were later declared killed in action. Kendall is buried at Phaleron War Cemetery south-east of Athens, Greece. Kendall’s name also appears on the war memorial in Thornhill.

Kendall Lake is southwest of Churchill.

Klassen, Gordon Fourest (May 7, 1918–August 19, 1942)
Rank: Lance Corporal
Service Number: B68196
Branch of Service: Royal Regiment of Canada, Royal Canadian Infantry Corps
Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Gordon Klassen was born in Plum Coulee and at the time of his enlistment on June 7, 1941, was working at the Terminal Warehouse in Toronto as a supply packer. Klassen took part in the raid on Dieppe, known as Operation Jubilee, and was killed in action. Klassen is buried at the Dieppe Canadian War Cemetery near Dieppe, France. His cousin Peter Klassen of the South Saskatchewan Regiment was killed in action on September 14, 1944.

Klassen Lake is north of Lac Brochet.

Krahn, George Cornelius (December 1, 1920–June 13, 1944)
Rank: Pilot Officer
Service Number: J85031
Branch of Service: 415 Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force
Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Born in Russia, Krahn’s family came to Canada in 1924 and settled in Winkler. When Krahn enlisted on May 26, 1941, he was working as a store salesman for A.C. Penner in Arnaud. After training as a pilot in a number of locations across Canada including Brandon and Dauphin, Krahn reached England in May 1943. On June 13, 1944, Krahn was initially reported missing after air operations over Belgium. He was the 1st Pilot of a Wellington HZ659 bomber that was engaged in exercise “Percolate” along with a number of Beaufighters. Their missions was to illuminate enemy E-boats for the Beaufighters in the vicinity of Ostend, Belgium. A group of 17 E-boats was spotted and attacked. Another aircraft in the vicinity reported seeing “a very heavy concentration of heavy and light flak and then what appeared to be an aircraft suddenly burst into flames and go into the sea at an angle of forty-five degrees.” All seven crew members were later reported killed in action. Krahn is buried at Flushing (Vlissingen) Northern Cemetery on the island of Walcheren in the Schelde Estuary, Netherlands. Krahn’s name also appears on the war memorial in Winkler.

Krahn Lake is northeast of Lac Brochet.

Law, William (January 19, 1913–April 25, 1943)
Rank: Private
Service Number: H19566
Branch of Service: Queen’s Own Cameron Highlanders of Canada, Royal Canadian Infantry Corps
Canadian Virtual War Memorial

William Law was born in Morden and was working as a labourer when he enlisted on September 13, 1939. He trained in Canada before arriving in England in 1941. At the time of his death, Law was stationed in England. While descending a hill on his bicycle, Law was unable to navigate a sharp turn in time. He hit a curb and was thrown from his bicycle. He struck a wall and suffered a fatal skull fracture. His wife Frances served with the Canadian Women’s Army Corps in Winnipeg as did his sister Martha. His brother Irwin also served with the Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry. Law is buried at Brookwood Military Cemetery in the United Kingdom.
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Law Lake is north of Lac Brochet.

Lewis, David Earl Kitchener (March 1, 1915–April 19, 1945)
Rank: Leading Aircraftman
Service Number: R181754
Branch of Service: Royal Canadian Air Force
Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Born in Morden, Earl Lewis was an agriculture student at the University of Manitoba. He was living and working for the Dominion Government at the Dominion Experimental Station in Swift Current, Saskatchewan when he enlisted with the Royal Canadian Air Force on August 20, 1942. Lewis died in Souris while training at the service flying training school. His death was attributed to heart failure resulting from the chloroform anesthesia used during a medical procedure to address an infected hand. His brother James was killed on April 14, 1940, while serving with the Royal Air Force. His father, David Llewellyn Lewis, was Captain of the 18th Mounted Rifles during the Great War and died of influenza on November 10, 1918. Lewis is buried at Manitou Community Cemetery in Manitou.
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Lewis Lake near Naicam, Saskatchewan is named for him.

Lewis, James Frederick Byng (July 27, 1918–April 14, 1940)
Rank: Aircraftman 2nd Class
Service Number: 644842
Branch of Service: 40 Squadron, Royal Air Force
Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Jimmy Lewis was born in Morden. He left Canada in March 1939 and worked his way to England on a freighter. He joined the 40th Bomber Squadron of the Royal Air Force. According to reports, Lewis “borrowed” Bristol Blenheim bomber L9207 that he was guarding at RAF Wyton and set out for Norway. The plane crashed in the Thames estuary east of London and his body was never recovered. His brother Earl died in Canada on April 19, 1945, while serving with the Royal Canadian Air Force. His father, David Llewellyn Lewis, was Captain of the 18th Mounted Rifles during the Great War and died of influenza on November 10, 1918. Lewis’ name is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial in the United Kingdom. He was Morden’s first casualty of the Second World War.

James Lewis Bay is on Bolton Lake, just east of Norway House.

Longney, Leonard Victor (August 27, 1922–June 13, 1944)
Rank: Private
Service Number: H103457
Branch of Service: Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry, Royal Canadian Infantry Corps.
Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Born in Morden, Leonard Longey lived in Thornhill where he attended school. He was working on the family farm when he enlisted with the Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry on November 20, 1942. After training in Canada, Longney arrived in the UK in early September 1943 and then Italy in November 1943. Longney suffered a large through and through high explosive shrapnel wound to his right hip on May 23, 1944, near Monte Cassino in Italy. On June 6, 1944, doctors reported that he was slowly recovering but by June 11 his condition began to deteriorate and he died two days later. Longney is buried at Cassino Military Cemetery in Italy. Longney’s name also appears on the war memorial in Thornhill.

Longney Lake is northeast of Brochet.

Lovett, Donald Alexander (March 15, 1924–August 13, 1944)
Rank: Sergeant
Service Number: H41464
Branch of Service: Essex Scottish Regiment, Royal Canadian Infantry Corps
Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Donald Lovett was born in Morden and at the time of his enlistment with the Royal Winnipeg Rifles on October 28, 1940, he was working as a telephone lineman. Although under-age, his parents allowed him to remain in the army. He arrived in the United Kingdom in July 1942 and was transferred to the Essex Scottish Regiment in September that year. He suffered a shrapnel wound to the head on June 13, 1944, and was in a coma when he arrived at the 75 General Hospital and was reported to have died within five minutes of his admission. Lovett is buried at Bayeux British Cemetery near Bayeux, France.
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Lovett Lake is south of Churchill.

Lumgair, Norman Andrew (April 12, 1922–March 15, 1944)
Rank: Pilot Officer
Service Number: R157269
Branch of Service: 408 Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force
Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Norman Lumgair was born in Thornhill and worked on the family farm. He attempted to enlist with the Royal Canadian Air Force on December 6, 1940, but was rejected for medical reasons. He succeeded in joining the RCAF after enlisting again on February 26, 1942. On the night of March 15 and 16, 1944, Lumgair was the pilot of a Lancaster II bomber that failed to return to base after bombing operations over Stuttgart, Germany. All seven crew members were reported missing and then later killed in action. Their Lancaster bomber was one of 37 aircraft lost during the raid on Stuttgart. His brother, Warrant Officer Robert Oliver Lumgair, also served in the RCAF and was awarded the Distinguished Flying Cross as a result of his actions during a bombing operation over Hanover, Germany, in October 1943. Lumgair is buried at Hilsenheim Communal Cemetery in Hilsenheim, France. Lumgair’s name also appears on the war memorial in Thornhill.

Lumgair Creek is on Sipiwesk Lake, northeast of Wabowden.

Monoghan, Allan Davis (October 7, 1920–May 14, 1943)
Rank: Flight Sergeant
Service Number: R133810
Branch of Service: 57 (R.A.F.) Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force
Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Born in Morden, Allan Monoghan first enlisted on September 18, 1939, with the Canadian Active Service Force and joined the Queen’s Own Cameron Highlanders of Canada. At the time, he was working in Morden for the Rabinovitch Brothers as a clerk. He worked as an instructor in light machine gun at Camp Borden for 18 months. In September 1941, Monoghan was discharged from the army and re-enlisted in the Royal Canadian Air Force. On May 14, 1943, Monoghan was an air gunner on a Lancaster bomber that was making an attack on Pilsen, Germany. The plane was shot down between Ruehlertwist and Neuringe, Germany, with all crew lost. Monoghan is buried at Reichswald Forest War Cemetery south of Kleve, Germany. His brothers Ramsay and Douglas also served.

Monaghan Lake is between Flin Flon and Sand Lake Provincial Park.

Oddy, Herbert (October 18, 1921–July 27, 1943)
Rank: Private
Service Number: H17792
Branch of Service: Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry, Royal Canadian Infantry Corps
Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Born as Herbert Earl Perry, Herbert Oddy was adopted by Jane Oddy on August 8, 1927. Oddy worked as a farm labourer for Albert Irving of Darlingford, Manitoba. He enlisted on November 4, 1941, and after training with the Princess Patricia’s Canadian Light Infantry in Winnipeg for six months, arrived in the United Kingdom in May 1942. In June 1943, Oddy reached Italy where he was killed in action in Sicily. Oddy is buried at Agira Canadian War Cemetery in Sicily, Italy.
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Oddy Lake is north of Lac Brochet.

Piercy, Reginald Frank (August 16, 1909–February 25, 1945)
Rank: Flight Sergeant
Service Number: R253010
Branch of Service: 429 Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force
Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Frank Piercy was born in the RM of Daly. He attended #3 Bombing and Gunnery School near Portage la Prairie from December 1943 to March 1944. Piercy was on a Halifax III bomber that was ordered to lay mines in the Oslo Fjord, Norway. All seven crew members were reported lost. Piercy is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial in the United Kingdom. Piercy’s name is also on the war memorial in Rivers, Manitoba.

Piercy Lake is northwest of Churchill.

Ratinksy, Walter (July 14, 1918–July 4, 1944)
Rank: Rifleman
Service Number: H41254
Branch of Service: Royal Winnipeg Rifles, Royal Canadian Infantry Corps
Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Walter Rohatynski served as Walter Ratinsky. Born in Winnipeg, Ratinsky enlisted with the Royal Winnipeg Rifles on June 27, 1940. At the time, he was living in Morden with his family and working as a labourer at Albert Spangelo’s plant nursery. He arrived in the United Kingdom in September 1941 where he trained until D-Day. Ratinsky was killed in action in France. He is buried at Beny-sur-Mer Canadian War Cemetery in Normandy east of the village of Reviers, France.

Ratinsky Lake is north of Lac Brochet.

Reichert, Clifford Clarence (October 25, 1919–June 22, 1943)
Rank: Pilot Officer
Service Number: J18083
Branch of Service: 408 Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force
Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Born in Thornhill, Clifford Reichert attended school in Thornhill. He joined the Royal Canadian Air Force in 1941 and trained in Brandon, Edmonton, and Calgary. Reichert was the pilot of a Halifax bomber that hit by fire from an enemy night-fighter and shot down and crashed into the river Lek in the Netherlands during a mission to Krefeld, Germany. Despite fire sweeping the cockpit, Reichert kept the plane level allowing two surviving crew to escape. One of them, air gunner Flying Officer George Pridham, wrote the following in a letter to Reichert’s parents in November 1943:

“As you may know I was a member of your son’s crew. I thought I had better drop you a line and tell you about Clifford. He was the bravest man I ever knew. He died to save my life. The Germans informed me that the crew were all dead except the navigator and myself. I had my leg shot off, and Clifford held the ship up so I could get out, then it was too late for him. The navigator, Russell, got out without a scratch … It pains me every time I think of him. He was the best pilot that ever flew.”

Reichert was recommended for a Victoria Cross but was Mentioned in Despatches instead.

His brothers Howard, Edward and William Henry also served. Reichert is commemorated on the Runnymede Memorial in the United Kingdom. Reichert’s name is also on the war memorial in Thornhill. A scouting group in the Netherlands is named in honour of Reichert.

Reichert Lake is northeast of Flin Flon.

Runner, Joseph Moore (October 28, 1917–March 8, 1942)
Rank: Pilot Officer
Service Number: J15172
Branch of Service: 115 Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force
Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Joseph Runner was born in Winnipeg and was living in Treherne, Manitoba when he enlisted with the Royal Canadian Air Force on May 9, 1940. In March 1942, Runner was an air gunner on a Wellington bomber that failed to return from a mission over France. Runner was awarded a Distinguished Flying Medal in March 1942:

“This airman has proved himself to be a cool and courageous air gunner when flying over well-defended areas in difficult conditions. Apart from his duties as rear gunner, Sgt. Runner has always taken a keen interest in map reading and in obtaining intelligent information whilst over enemy territory. On several occasions, it has been largely due to his excellent pinpointing that his crew have been able to identify and bomb their objective. The sorties in which he has participated have included many of most important targets in Germany and occupied territory.”

Runner’s name is also on the war memorial in Treherne, Manitoba.

Runner Lake is straight north of Flin Flon.

Schellenberg, Herman Stephen (April 20, 1915–November 21, 1943)
Rank: Flying Officer
Service Number: J9154
Branch of Service: 418 Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force
Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Herman “Schelly” Schellenberg was born in Herbert, Saskatchewan and was living in New Bothwell, Manitoba, when he enlisted on July 25, 1940. At the time, he was working as a school teacher in Altona with the Thames School District. He stated when he enlisted that he did “not wish to hold down a cushy job while someone with dependents does his fighting for him.” Schellenberg trained as a navigator with the Royal Canadian Air Force. Schellenberg, along with Pilot Thomas Thomson, were killed when their Mosquito bomber crashed near Lyminster Church in Lyminster, England during a night flying test. His brothers Jacob, David, William, and George also served. Schellenberg is buried at Brookwood Cemetery, United Kingdom. Schellenberg’s name is also on the war memorial in Altona, Manitoba.

Schellenberg Creek is northeast of Pointe du Bois.

Schnell, Walter Roy (September 17, 1924–July 30, 1944)
Rank: Fusilier
Service Number: H103914
Branch of Service: Princess Louise Fusiliers, Royal Canadian Infantry Corps
Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Walter Schnell was born in Morden and when he enlisted on December 11, 1942, he was working as a mechanic and truck driver at the Brunns Garage in Morden. He wanted to join the paratroopers. After completing his training in Canada, Schnell arrived in the United Kingdom in October 1943. From there, he was sent to Italy in January 1944. Schnell died as a result of a ruptured appendix. Schnell is buried at Caserta War Cemetery in Caserta, Italy. His brothers Philip and Ernest also served.

Schnell Lake is near the northwest corner of Manitoba.

Silkey, Samuel (May 2, 1905–December 19, 1941)
Rank: Private
Service Number: H6561
Branch of Service: Winnipeg Grenadiers, Royal Canadian Infantry Corps
Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Sam Silkey’s exact birth location is not known. His family settled in the Brown district where he attended school and worked on his father’s farm. At the time of his enlistment on September 23, 1939, he was living in Selkirk, Manitoba, where he worked as a harness maker. Silkey married Bessie Viola Jefferson in May, 1940. He was sent with the Winnipeg Grenadiers to Hong Kong where he was initially reported as missing in action following the attack by the Japanese army. He was later declared killed in action at Jardine’s Lookout as a result of trench mortar shrapnel. Silkey is buried at the Sai Wan Memorial, Hong Kong. Silkey’s name is also on the war memorial in Selkirk, Manitoba.

Silkey Lake is straight west of Churchill.

Sirluck, Robert (November 15, 1922–March 1, 1944)
Rank: Pilot Officer
Service Number: J86913
Branch of Service: 76 (R.A.F.) Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force
Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Born in Winkler, Robert Sirluck enlisted with the Royal Canadian Air Force on March 26, 1942. At the time, he was a second-year agriculture student at the University of Manitoba and was working in the office at his father’s grain elevator in Winkler. He was an air bomber on a Halifax bomber that crashed shortly after taking off for an operational flight against the enemy. Sirluck and the other six crew members were all killed. Sirluck is buried at Harrogate (Stonefall) Cemetery in Yorkshire, United Kingdom. Sirluck’s name is also on the war memorial in Winkler and on the Shaarey Zedek war memorial in Winnipeg.

Sirluck Lake is east of Flin Flon.

Spencer, Ralph Ernest (December 10, 1920–June 6, 1944)
Rank: Corporal
Service Number: H40660
Branch of Service: Royal Winnipeg Rifles, Royal Canadian Infantry Corps
Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Ralph Spencer was born in Morden and was working as a labourer on his father’s farm when he enlisted on June 13, 1940. A few months earlier, on February 5, 1940, he married Hazel Ellen Martindale at Snowflake, Manitoba. He had also been a member of the Manitoba Mounted Rifles militia. He trained in Canada until August 1941 and then in the United Kingdom until June 3, 1944. He died of wounds received in action on D-Day. Spencer is buried at Beny-sur-Mer Canadian War Cemetery near Reviers, France. His sister Myrtle also served.

Spencer Lake is north of Lac Brochet.

Steenson, William Joseph (August 24, 1920–April 14, 1944)
Rank: Warrant Officer Class II
Service Number: R106347
Branch of Service: Royal Canadian Air Force
Canadian Virtual War Memorial

William Steenson was born near Darlingford and graduated from high school in Morden in 1938. He enlisted with the Royal Canadian Air Force in May 1941 and graduated as a pilot in 1942. He was a flight instructor at Portage la Prairie and then Paulson. Steenson was killed during a routine training flight at No. 7 Bombing and Gunnery School at Paulson, Manitoba. Steenson is buried in Darlingford Cemetery in Darlingford, Manitoba. Steenson’s name is also listed on the war memorials in Manitou and Darlingford.

Steenson Lake is near Tadoule Lake.

Unruh, Victor Allison (September 27, 1914–July 18, 1944)
Rank: Pilot Officer
Service Number: J87613
Branch of Service: 427 Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force
Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Victor Unruh was born in Ukraine and his family came to Winkler in 1925. He was a teacher in the Ruby School District in the RM of Swan River, Manitoba, when he enlisted with the Royal Canadian Air Force on April 7, 1942. Unruh was a navigator on a Halifax bomber that was hit by anti-aircraft fire while on a bombing mission over occupied France. All members of the crew were killed. Unruh is buried at Bretteville-sur-Laize Canadian War Cemetery near the village of Cintheaux. Unruh’s name is also on the war memorial in Winkler. His brother John also served.

Unruh Lake is southwest of Churchill.

Wiebe, Henry (December 9, 1921–December 21, 1941)
Rank: Private
Service Number: H77148
Branch of Service: Winnipeg Grenadiers, Royal Canadian Infantry Corps
Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Henry Wiebe was born in Swift Current, Saskatchewan and was a farm labourer when he enlisted in Cartwright, Manitoba, on May 31, 1941. Wiebe was sent to Hong Kong with the Winnipeg Grenadiers in December 1941 and was killed in action. Wiebe is buried at the Sai Wan Memorial in Hong Kong. Wiebe’s name is also on the war memorial in Winkler. His brothers John and Elmer also served.

Wiebe Lake is southwest of Tadoule Lake.

Wolfe, Jacob Henry (July 21, 1921–March 8, 1945)
Rank: Corporal
Service Number: H41572
Branch of Service: Lincoln and Welland Regiment, Royal Canadian Infantry Corps
Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Jacob Wolfe was born in Morden and enlisted with the Royal Winnipeg Rifles on April 8, 1941. At the time of his enlistment, he was working as a labourer on Joe Hanzel’s farm. He arrived in France in July 1944 with the Lincoln and Welland Regiment and suffered a bullet wound to the right upper arm on October 25, 1944. Wolfe was killed in action the following spring near Veen, Germany. Wolfe is buried at Groesbeek Canadian War Cemetery in the Netherlands.

Wolfe Lake is north of Lac Brochet.

Yudell, Isador Nicholas (June 6, 1916–January 6, 1943)
Rank: Flight Sergeant
Service Number: R91968
Branch of Service: 104 Squadron, Royal Canadian Air Force
Canadian Virtual War Memorial

Isador Yudell was born in Winnipeg and was working as a clerk in his uncle Milton Rabinovitch’s store when he enlisted in April 1941. He was also a member of the Manitoba Mounted Rifles and the Independent Order of Odd Fellows Canada. After joining the Royal Canadian Air Force, Yudell trained as a pilot at flight schools in Saskatchewan. Yudell was the 2nd pilot of a Wellington bomber that left Malta for a night attack on Tunis. Their aircraft was reported to have been hit by anti-aircraft over Sousse, Tunisia, and crashed a few miles southwest of Sousse. Yudell’s body was not recovered and he has no known grave. Yudell’s name is listed on the Malta Memorial in Malta. Yudell’s name is also on the Shaarey Zedek war memorial in Winnipeg.

Yuddell Lake is west of Churchill.

Zilkey, Herman (?–?)
Rank: ?
Service Number: ?
Branch of Service: ?

There has been no information found thus far to confirm the identity or death of Herman Zilkey.